The Age of Reason

18.00

Title: Age of Wisdom

Author: Jean-Paul Sartre

Translator: Hossein Soleimani Nejad

Publisher: Cheshmeh

Subject: French story

Age category: Adult

Cover: Paperback

Number of pages: 375 p

Language: Farsi

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Description

The Age of Reason  is written by Jean-Paul Sartre and translated by Mahmoud Jazayeri. Sutter, as one of the most influential writers and theorists of the modern world, depicts a different world of his past works in this novel.

The Age of Wisdom tells the life story of a philosophy teacher named Mathieu, who searches every door to find a way to prevent the birth of his unwanted child. He is looking for a way and money to get rid of the third creature that he thinks will destroy his freedom.

In this way, the protagonist gradually moves away from his past and cuts ties, but eventually comes to the conclusion that he has failed in his search for freedom and finds himself an exile who is doomed to freedom ….

It is worth mentioning that the novel “Age of Wisdom” was published in 1944, and the effects of this novel became known more quickly and became more popular after a year and at the same time with the end of the Second World War.
The book “Age of Reason” by Jean-Paul Sartre has been translated by Mahmoud Jazayeri. About Sartre: “Sartre was a French philosopher, existentialist, novelist, playwright and critic. He sought fame as a child. That’s why he turned to writing. For a long time, however, his writings were returned one after another by publishers, and so he could not fulfill his long-held dream.

But in 1938, with the writing of his first philosophical novel, Nausea, he achieved widespread fame. In this shocking novel, the appalling apprehension of existence and the inherent futility of existence are depicted with unprecedented boldness. He then began writing a series of short stories called The Wall (1939), which remained unfinished due to the outbreak of World War II. Sartre was in contact with Simone de Beauvoir for the rest of his life; “But those who considered marriage a bourgeois affair did not marry for the rest of their lives.” This book has been published by Jami Publications and made available to readers.

The collection of novels The Roads to Freedom, written by Sartre, is like a patterned rug and drawing that aims to provide a concise picture of the many ways that people choose to achieve freedom. But its texture is in a variety of ways and styles that are ultimately unfinished.
The first volume of this collection is called Age of Reason and the second volume is called Suspension or Amnesty, both of which were published in 1945. And the third volume of this collection is called Torture of the Soul or Despair, which was published in 1949. Finally, in November and December of that year, Sartre wrote two chapters in the fourth volume of the series called Strange Friendship, which was published in New Age magazine. But then he announced that he did not intend to continue it, and thus the completion of this series failed.

Part of the book Age of Reason
Lula looked happy and turned to Boris. He did not like to look at Lula when she looked like that. He was sad. It seemed ridiculous to the man, but there was nothing he could do. He did everything that was expected of him. He was loyal to Lula. He often called her, visiting her three times a week when she returned from Sumatra, and that night you slept in her apartment. The rest was a matter of behavior. Age was also an issue.

Older people become bitter at times, and behave as if their lives are in danger. Once, when Boris was a child, a spoon fell from his hand. When he was told to pick up the spoon, he refused and was taken aback. Then his father, in a regal tone that would never be forgotten, said, “Well, I will cut it.” Boris had seen his father tall, and his hairless head bent, and he heard various sounds.

All of this was blasphemous and intolerable, and he was outraged. From then on, the elders were seen as great and incompetent people. If they bent down, he thought they were on the verge of breaking; If they slipped and fell, the situation that arose was a desire to laugh and disgust with fear; And if tears welled up in their eyes, like a hinge at that moment, he would be amazed.
The tears of the elders were a spiritual catastrophe, like the tears that God sheds on human wickedness. Of course, on the other hand, he respects Lula for being emotional. Matthew had explained to him that every human being should have emotion. And so did Descartes.

“Dolaro has his own emotions, but that does not make anything important,” Boland said, following his thoughts. “She is free.”

“I am free in this respect. “I do not care about anything but you.”

Boris did not answer.

“Am I not free?” Lula asked.

“Things are different.”

It was very difficult to explain; Lula was a victim, had no chance, and relied heavily on emotions that did not benefit her. This was not bad in a way; It was actually very good, in principle; Boris had talked to Ivitch about it, and they both agreed it was a good thing. But the way to do it is different.

If it was used to destroy someone, either out of despair or to affirm their freedom, it was perfectly right, but Lula dealt with it with greedy carelessness, it was a means of relieving her. He was not even thrilled with it. He was not even thrilled.

Sentences from the text of the book Age of Reason
1- Lola looked happy and turned Boris. He did not like to look at Lula when she looked like that. He was sad. It seemed ridiculous to the man, but there was nothing he could do. He did everything that was expected of him. He was loyal to Lula. He often called her, visiting her three times a week when she returned from Sumatra, and that night you slept in her apartment. The rest was a matter of behavior.

Age was also an issue. Older people become bitter at times, and behave as if their lives are in danger. Once, when Boris was a child, a spoon fell from his hand.
When he was told to pick up the spoon, he refused and was taken aback. Then his father, in a regal tone that would never be forgotten, said, “Well, I will cut it.” Boris had seen his father tall, and his hairless head bent, and he heard various sounds. All of this was blasphemous and intolerable, and he was outraged.

From then on, the elders were seen as great and incompetent people. If they bent down, he thought they were on the verge of breaking; If they slipped and fell, the situation that arose was a desire to laugh and disgust with fear; And if tears welled up in their eyes, like a hinge at that moment, he would be amazed. The tears of the elders were a spiritual catastrophe, like the tears that God sheds on human wickedness. Of course, on the other hand, he respects Lula for being emotional. Matthew had explained to him that every human being should have emotion. And so did Descartes.

About the author of The Age of Wisdom, Jean-Paul Sartre
Jean-Paul Charles Imar Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980) was a French philosopher, existentialist, novelist, playwright, and critic.

Sartre was born on June 21, 1905 in Paris. His father, Jean-Baptiste Sartre (1847–1906), was a French naval officer, and his mother, Anne-Marie Schweizer (1882–1969), was the cousin of the famous physician Albert Schweizer, a Nobel Peace Prize winner. His father died of a fever at the age of fifteen months. His mother then returned to her parents in Modon.
His grandfather, Charles Schweizer, one of Albert Schweizer’s uncles, taught German at school. Jean was raised at home under him and several other private tutors and learned to read and write (French and German) at an early age. As a child, his right eye developed cataracts, gradually deviated outward, and lost his sight.

Jean was sent to a boarding school in Paris in 1920. There he met one of his classmates, Paul Nizan, and this acquaintance led to a long-term friendship. Nizan was instrumental in introducing contemporary literature to Sartre.
He graduated in 1922, after which he decided to continue teaching with Nizan at the عالیcole Supérieure de Paris. 1924 – Seventh out of 35 finalists in the entrance exam. Together with Nizan, they start publishing a magazine in Daneshsara.

After graduating from Le Havre and Lyon High Schools, he taught philosophy. After a while, he decided to go to Germany to complete his research in Husserl’s philosophy of phenomenology. He went to Germany on a scholarship and continued his studies in Berlin. It was here that he became more deeply acquainted with the works of great philosophers such as Martin Heidegger (Philosophy of Existentialism) and Edmund Husserl (Philosophy of Phenomenology). But after a while he could not stand the Nazi German government, so he returned to Paris and began teaching philosophy.

The name of Jean-Paul Sartre is reminiscent of the philosophy of existentialism and a leading literary movement. Some, called Sartre, thought of smoky cafes in Paris, where Juliette Greco sang in a black collar dress to passionate French youth (chanson).
In addition to Sartre’s philosophical treatises, his plays and novels also reflect his philosophical and moral views. In The Flies, his first major play (1943), Sartre outlines the foundations of existentialist aesthetics.

Sartre’s literary works as a whole reflect the aesthetic theory known as “committed literature.” One of the characteristics of Sartre’s literary works is its dependence on specific temporal and spatial conditions. Therefore, on the one hand, one can explain the widespread acceptance of Sartre’s novels, especially the performance of his plays between 1945 and 1966, and on the other hand, why Sartre’s plays European countries have rarely been on the scene in the last 20 years.

Sartre was recognized as the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1964, but refused to do so, in order to emphasize his literary and perhaps political independence. But since there is no place for such a thing in the rules and regulations of the Nobel Committee, Sartre is still the winner of the 1964 Literary Nobel.

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